ONES @ The Outlet Dance Project

Most exciting news!

ONES is part of this years amazing line up of @ The Outlet Dance Project!

Dance on Film Fest
5 October 2017
7pm, New Jersey, USA
for tickets click here

ONES is a collaboration between Dutch visual artist Anne Verheij and Japanese choreographer Miku Tsuchiya, in which film and dance are explored across the former pedestrian tunnels of Elephant & Castle, London.
Juxtaposing two dance films created from the same footage, ONES captures the individual’s rhythm beating amidst the pulse of the restless city.
ONES – 2 women, 2 countries, 2 disciplines – 1 film

Concept | camera | montage – Anne Verheij
Performance | montage – Miku Tsuchiya
Sound design – Jack Goodwin
© ANNE• 2015

 

 

 

 

The Outlet Dance Project is committed to providing artists who identify or have identified as women an opportunity to share their artistic vision through site-specific dance, film, and work created for the stage. In partnership with Grounds For Sculpture – an internationally renowned contemporary sculpture park – collaboration, community building, and interdisciplinary experimentation are an integral part of the festival. The Outlet is dedicated to supporting all traditional and nontraditional dance forms. The festival celebrates the intersections of visual and moving arts, exploring relationships between sculpture and dance, between place and movement.

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ONES part 2 news!

After months of finding new ways to communicate via the internet, Miku and I were able to start finalising the second part of ONES, a proposed triptych.

Now that Miku is based in China we have to deal with the harsher Internet rules and regulations there. Though the time difference is now 7 hours instead of 9, finding ways to upload and download our work and call each other to discuss the process has brought new challenges. The ‘patience’ that is needed in order to produce and develop our work across continents, can at times become a real strain on our working method.

BUT seeing each other’s work for the first time last week made all our hard work worthwhile.

For this second part of our proposed triptych we have yet again worked individually on our own films. As in the first part of ONES, our process consists of carefully choosing footage and sounds together and then editing our individual films on our own, without communicating what we are doing.

By using the exact same video footage, shot back when Miku was in London, and using the soundtrack by Jack Goodwin as our time line, we have created two distinct videos that come together by our binding theme of communicating over a far distance.

The rhythm and focus of both films are opposites of each other. Miku’s film seems to be an anchor formed by a continuous rhythm like a person breathing, where my film focuses on Miku and telling her story by getting under her skin. These very different films come together through a vertical communication on a single screen, where they together, like the title implies, form the interior and exterior of a person.

More on the finalising of the second part of this project soon!
Keep an eye out for updates on Facebook and Twitter.

 

ONES2©ANNE•2016

Miku Tsuchiya on ONES part 2:

Anne Verheij and myself are excited to announce that our second part of the ‘ONES’ triptych is in its final stage of editing. It will have a first private viewing in June 2016 in London.

Before this film will have its first public appearance, we thought it would be nice to share our experience of our editing process on this second part of our proposed triptych. So here it is!

……….

Since the beginning of this year we’ve been editing individually on this second part of the project, and just last week, we exchanged our edited films, viewing them for the first time.

My first impression of watching Anne’s version of the film was “Wow! This is so different from mine!” I was shocked by the difference and the fact that our films had almost nothing in common!
My second immediate thoughts were “How it’s possible to put these two completely different films together in one piece?… is it even possible?”
Actually, Anne had a similair reaction as mine. We were both completely in shock. The two films turned out completely different from the first part of our ONES triptych. It was very unexpected and thrilling.

My Notes from watching Anne’s film:

“Repetition, abrupt, directions, focus on the body, movement tells a story, theme developing, body speaking, falling, tensions, emotions, fragments of memories, blank … ” (19 May, 2016)

So the fun part began: looking for the possibilities to make these films speak together.

My Notes from watching the 1st trial of playing the two films together

We first tried to put the two films besides each other, horizontally, like we did for the first part of our triptych. This, however, didn’t work as well as we thought. The two films hardly spoke to one another and it created completely separated worlds.

“My eyes are busy, looking right to left, left to right. I don’t know where to look or where to focus. My eyes zoom in on one film, completely missing the other… This is much too busy. As the scenes kept changing, I was left behind. This way a story kept building and instantly diminishing as soon as I looked away. This left me with no flow and no communication between two films. Separate…” (19 May, 2016)

My Notes from watching the 2nd and 3rd trial of playing the two films together

We decided to try and put our two films vertically, the one on top of the other. Surprisingly, this way worked and our films started to speak to each other.

“The two films started to communicate. Sharing a same world. One film is like a under current, which is always there, holding and carrying: like a container, like an anchor holding you in place. The other film is like a reflection, a glimpse of what’s happening in that current, like a magnifying glass: it focuses, it magnifies the invisible world beneath the surface, it tells the invisible story… 

At first, the two worlds of each individual film seem very different in its horizontal display, hardly able to communicate with each other, but when we looked at it with a vertical perspective, it started to communicate beyond the visible boundaries and in that moment two worlds became ONE.” (19 May, 2016)

This vertical option worked out beautifully, and we both started to see the huge possibilities of where this project is going. At this point we were reminded that what we saw happening on screen was the drive of this project:

2 women
2 voices
2 countries
2 disciplines
2 intuitions
2 rhythms
————–
1 installation

I was very fascinated to see that the drive behind this project is now taking a strong visual form on the screen and I can’t wait to see more!

……….

If you’re interested, please stay tuned!

ONES – week 5 – Editing

Over the last weeks Miku and I have been in conversation with our composers Cassie Kinoshi and Jack Goodwin to come to three separate soundtracks. Both composers have very different styles and backgrounds, which makes for an intriguing input for our editing process. At the beginning of April they received our selected sounds, film stills and impressions. From there they each took the sounds to a new level where the sounds were stretched, distorted and shaped into a rhythmic soundtrack.
Since their soundscapes are simultaneously our timelines in order for Miku and I to edit our films to independently, it will be a real experiment to see how their work influences our editing process.

Miku and I are now in the process of choosing specific footage from each location to start this editing process. The aim for us is to both have the same footage to edit with, but not to communicate on how we are going to edit it before or while we are editing.

The planning was to start this process back in April, but due to serious computer malfunction we had to postpone this process to June.
We will keep you posted on this exciting project of which we are planning a showing of work in progress in the beginning of July!

ONES
2 women
2 voices
2 countries
2 disciplines
2 intuitions
2 rhythms
————
1 installation

Miku_falling©ANNE•_2014Photo by © ANNE• 2015

 

OF(f) COURSE – ANNE• & Kathrin Gramelsberger

OF(f) COURSE is a new research project in collaboration with Kathrin Gramelsberger. It stems from my graduation piece ‘On An Empty Stomach’, for which I received distinction at Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance, London.

Spread through multiple locations in London Kathrin and I went looking for movement and rhythm. I examined various ways in which I can compose my digital canvas to achieve a digital collage painting. My central focus point is rhythm, which I research through elements of light, lines, textures, repetition and movement. Kathrin has gone in search of the movement and rhythm in the location and how they affect her own movements.

Follow the research that extends between London and Amsterdam right here.

OFf COURSE©ANNE•_2015Photo by © ANNE• 2015

 

ONES – week 2 – sound

2 women
2 voices
2 countries
2 disciplines
2 intuitions
2 rhythms
————–
1 installation
Miku_falling©ANNE•_2014

 

 

 

[16-02-15 UK] Anne Point:

Thoughts on location 2:
Japan sounds – precise and rhythmic ‘submerging with the body of dancers into the world created on the digital canvas.’
UK sounds – echoing rhythms ‘following the lines in a hard vs soft distance’

This week Miku and I both had a longer list of sounds. It almost seemed that location 2, being at the sea sight, directed us automatically towards water sounds. It is funny however, that the both of us collected mechanic water sounds or water that seems to have been contained rather than natural water sounds.

The question if we want to emphasize either the body or the space with the sounds, led our conversation onto interesting paths of how we watch and remember our footage. Example: ‘If we have a hard surface within the location on the canvas, would we rather use echoing sharp sounds to emphasize this or would we want to use muffled sounds as to give a juxtaposition to the expectation of sound to what you hear?’

A lot of the sounds were open to interpretation, thus helicopters and frying pans made their appearance in our minds eye were there were non. This made me very aware of the potential to manipulate the expectations and the perception of our footage for future spectators. Here my fascination for playing with what we know and what we think we know in order to come to a new experience is getting another major impulse.

——

[16-02-15 Japan] Miku:

Anne’s sounds = many of them have material / object / man made kind of edgy, sharp and hard sounds. Nature vs man made objects. Characteristics of the city. However, some of the sounds have both qualities of hard and soft, which reminds me of my body (soft) vs buildings / objects (hard) during the shooting.
Miku’s sound = softer, blur, abstract, round sounds. Many of them are water related sounds. Although, the second location was by the seaside, I was interested in using the sound of different forms of water to create a friction between visual and audible.

Questions
– Using the sound that is related to the object in the frame… Is this too literal? Does it pull away the audience, or does it emphasize the idea / theme?
– Do we always need to use the sound that is not literal? How much friction do we need between visual and audible?
– Am I choosing sounds according to my visual memories or kinaesthetic memories of the location?  What would be the difference if I chose visually or kinaesthetically?

More Thoughts
– Mix of natural sounds and man made sounds can be an interesting mix of quality. It causes friction. It creates the elastic world (non-fixed, ever-changing imaginational world)
– Choosing sounds according to the location’s quality, such as the quality of the objects/materials, spaces, lightings, density, colours, and more…
– Unexpected non-related sound has a possibility to re-shape the location differently. Visual effect could emphasize OR it could ruin the whole picture.

NYMPH()MANIAC: Volumes I and II – Lars von Trier

NymphomaniacNymph()maniac: a must see!

I was in luck to score the last ticket to this film double bill on Saturday 22 February in London, which ended with a live satellite Q&A with Stellan Skarsgård, Stacy Martin and Sophie Kennedy Clark.

This movie is an open conversation. A book with a simple story line and many chapters that invite you to enter the world of Joe. Documentary and fiction style grip you in their frames, frames that switch from 16:9 to 4:3 and more. It also contains collage, still image and multi staging, making it into a minefield for the senses, since you find yourself completely opened up by the inviting rhythm and speed of the movie.
Addressed in this movie are art, femininity, humor, society, lust, masculinity, jealousy, music, love, asexuality, stigma’s, fishing and choices.

No, it is not a porn movie. No, it is not a feminist movie.
Yes, it is a intriguing story, told with a great sense of humor and detail.

Go and see this one of a kind!